Don’t feel guilty – get angry – take action!

April 30, 2010

Maybe in reading about my Tale of Two OC Moms you got a little mad about your own births.  Or maybe you are happy you made the choices you did.

I read a great article in the Huffington Post where the author compared 2 births and how it effected the breastfeeding outcomes for these moms.

She talks about how some moms feel guilty if breastfeeding doesn’t work out for them, but how a lot of if a mom is successful with breastfeeding goes back to their birth experience and the hours right after birth.  It has a huge impact.  Hospitals often have policies in place that hurt the chances of breastfeeding being successful.

So I say the same thing about your birth, if you had a negative birth experience, don’t feel guilty, get angry and take action!  Help make changes in the system.

One easy way to do this is to fill out The Birth Survey about your experience so other moms know about the care providers they are choosing.

Another easy thing to do, if you are a cesarean mom, or just a mom worried about the rise in cesareans:  join ICAN.  This is a great organization fighting the rise in cesareans and offering support to cesarean moms.


Don't feel guilty – get angry – take action!

April 30, 2010

Maybe in reading about my Tale of Two OC Moms you got a little mad about your own births.  Or maybe you are happy you made the choices you did.

I read a great article in the Huffington Post where the author compared 2 births and how it effected the breastfeeding outcomes for these moms.

She talks about how some moms feel guilty if breastfeeding doesn’t work out for them, but how a lot of if a mom is successful with breastfeeding goes back to their birth experience and the hours right after birth.  It has a huge impact.  Hospitals often have policies in place that hurt the chances of breastfeeding being successful.

So I say the same thing about your birth, if you had a negative birth experience, don’t feel guilty, get angry and take action!  Help make changes in the system.

One easy way to do this is to fill out The Birth Survey about your experience so other moms know about the care providers they are choosing.

Another easy thing to do, if you are a cesarean mom, or just a mom worried about the rise in cesareans:  join ICAN.  This is a great organization fighting the rise in cesareans and offering support to cesarean moms.


Birth is a Journey: Shouldn’t we be able to choose our transportation?

March 5, 2010

Imagine 5 different women want to travel to America.  There are two ways to travel there:  an airplane or a boat.

Allison’s travel agent tells her about both options and the pros and cons of each.  Allison chooses an airplane because it is a good choice for her.

Britany wants to take the boat, but she is forced to take the airplane. They won’t let her board the boat because she broke her leg 5 years ago and they think the boat ride might be too long for her.

Callie doesn’t even know that boats are still an option.  (Her travel agent doesn’t sell boat tickets.)  So she takes the airplane even though she is scared of flying.

Dorian doesn’t know that boats are still an option either. (Her travel agent doesn’t sell boat tickets.) So she takes the airplane, but doesn’t really mind.

Evelyn wants to take a boat but her travel agent saw a boat accident and tells Evelyn how dangerous boats are.  She is torn because she really wants to take the boat, she has taken a boat before and enjoyed it, but her friends who are traveling with her want her to take the plane because they keep hearing how risky the boats can be.  So finally she agrees to the plane ride.

Fran’s travel agent tells her about both options and the pros and cons of each.  Fran chooses to take the boat because it is a good choice for her.

All of the women make it safely to America.  They are happy to be there, but in reflecting on their journey, some are happy and some are not.

  • Britany loves the water and feels disappointed she didn’t get to enjoy the beauty of the ocean during the journey.
  • Callie still has nightmares of the plane ride even though it was a fairly smooth flight.
  • Evelyn is angry because she has since found out about the risks of flying and really wishes she had taken the boat.

Some Questions to Ponder

How many of these moms actually had choices?

How many of the moms made good choices?

What is better to take the airplane or the boat?

I think women should have choices.  REAL choices!  They should not be forced or scared into the type of transportation they take, they should be informed about both choices.

Women shouldn’t take this lying down!  Let’s fight for honest information and real choices.

VBAC moms should have the choice of a repeat cesarean or a vaginal birth.  They should be given the risks of both in a calm rational way and then take that information and use their intuition to make the best decision for them.  We need to support them in whatever that choice is.

This post is in honor of the ICAN VBAC Blog Carnival.

For great information on the real risks of VBAC visit the VBACFACTS site.


Birth is a Journey: Shouldn't we be able to choose our transportation?

March 5, 2010

Imagine 5 different women want to travel to America.  There are two ways to travel there:  an airplane or a boat.

Allison’s travel agent tells her about both options and the pros and cons of each.  Allison chooses an airplane because it is a good choice for her.

Britany wants to take the boat, but she is forced to take the airplane. They won’t let her board the boat because she broke her leg 5 years ago and they think the boat ride might be too long for her.

Callie doesn’t even know that boats are still an option.  (Her travel agent doesn’t sell boat tickets.)  So she takes the airplane even though she is scared of flying.

Dorian doesn’t know that boats are still an option either. (Her travel agent doesn’t sell boat tickets.) So she takes the airplane, but doesn’t really mind.

Evelyn wants to take a boat but her travel agent saw a boat accident and tells Evelyn how dangerous boats are.  She is torn because she really wants to take the boat, she has taken a boat before and enjoyed it, but her friends who are traveling with her want her to take the plane because they keep hearing how risky the boats can be.  So finally she agrees to the plane ride.

Fran’s travel agent tells her about both options and the pros and cons of each.  Fran chooses to take the boat because it is a good choice for her.

All of the women make it safely to America.  They are happy to be there, but in reflecting on their journey, some are happy and some are not.

  • Britany loves the water and feels disappointed she didn’t get to enjoy the beauty of the ocean during the journey.
  • Callie still has nightmares of the plane ride even though it was a fairly smooth flight.
  • Evelyn is angry because she has since found out about the risks of flying and really wishes she had taken the boat.

Some Questions to Ponder

How many of these moms actually had choices?

How many of the moms made good choices?

What is better to take the airplane or the boat?

I think women should have choices.  REAL choices!  They should not be forced or scared into the type of transportation they take, they should be informed about both choices.

Women shouldn’t take this lying down!  Let’s fight for honest information and real choices.

VBAC moms should have the choice of a repeat cesarean or a vaginal birth.  They should be given the risks of both in a calm rational way and then take that information and use their intuition to make the best decision for them.  We need to support them in whatever that choice is.

This post is in honor of the ICAN VBAC Blog Carnival.

For great information on the real risks of VBAC visit the VBACFACTS site.


Cesarean on TV Creates Quite a Stir

February 9, 2010

Let’s help stir that pot!

I didn’t watch when the Today Show showed the cesarean, but I have read the many comments and agree that it doesn’t help moms understand the risks of cesarean.

I totally agree with what ICAN had to say!

If it upset you, feel free to join in the Mother Size Activism to let NBC know we don’t appreciate the slanted journalism.


Ending Female Pain – Review Coming

February 7, 2010

I got this book a few weeks ago in the mail so I could read and review it.

Frankly with the holidays and traveling and another trip coming up, I haven’t found the time to read it.

I quickly looked through it today and I am now intrigued.  I am lucky in that I don’t have Female Pain (if I did, I am sure I would have read it as soon as I got it!)   But there are women out there who do suffer and this looks like a GREAT resource for them.

I am setting a goal to read it in the next few weeks and come back with a real review.

But in case any of you are suffering out there, please go and get the book
Ending Female Pain: A Woman’s Manual – The Ultimate Self-Help Guide for Women Suffering from Chronic Pelvic and Sexual Pain


Birth Challenges can Empower Us!

January 22, 2010

I have mentioned Joy’s challenge in previous posts.

https://enjoybirth.wordpress.com/2009/10/16/horray-national-coverage/

and

https://enjoybirth.wordpress.com/2009/12/18/successful-vbac-for-arizona-mom/

Now you can read an

Interview with Joy Szabo

and see how the challenge of her fighting for a VBAC has inspired her to now help other mothers!  Thanks Joy, for being a wonderful example for us.


What a cesarean really looks like

December 8, 2009

This picture makes me want to weep.

I have been that woman

with my arms strapped down

my belly empty

feeling so alone

my baby in someone elses arms

I think this picture captures the scene so perfectly.


Amazing VBA2C at hospital with VBAC ban!

September 19, 2009

It doesn’t get any better than this!  🙂

Mariana was planning a VBA2C and used Hypnobabies to help prepare.  She hired a doula and was planning to birth at a hospital 30 minutes away that allowed VBACs.  Because she was so relaxed her doula didn’t realize she was so far along and they had to go to the hospital 5 minutes away and the baby was born 30 minutes later.  Vaginally at this hospital which prohibits VBACs. Maybe that was because there wasn’t time for them to figure that out!

You can read the whole story yourself at The Crafty Work At Home Momma!

This is also a nice reminder that if you are doulaing for a Hypnobabies Mom, don’t expect the normal signs to know how far along mom is!


Real Risks of VBAC

September 9, 2009

It is sad to me how many OBs will scare their patients into repeat cesareans.  They are not honest with the real risks of VBAC.  I want OBs to be honest about the risks and then let the mom choose what is best for her.

They should also be honest if the real reason they don’t support VBAC is because their insurance or the hospitals insurance won’t allow it, instead of scaring the mom into it.  Then if mom still wants a VBAC, refer her to an OB and hospital which will support it.

The statistical risk of tragic outcomes from a VBAC due to uterine rupture is EXTREMELY small.

Uterine rupture that actually causes perinatal morality has a probability of 0.00046. That is, by all measures, extremely, extremely rare. Also, all causes of perinatal mortality for VBAC were identical to perinatal mortality risk for a first time vaginal delivery.

Make your choice based on facts, not fear.